Ask us - absolutely free!

<< ASK - GET ANSWER!

Ask us - absolutely free!

Ask a chiropractor (free, no obligation advice!)

Troubled with stiff joints, tight muscles and pain? Here you can ask questions directly to the chiropractor regarding musculoskeletal disorders. You can choose to be completely anonymous in this counseling service. Our affiliated chiropractors offer advice, counseling, exercises and specific measures aimed directly at your problems - we are also helpful in getting you in touch with clinicians in your geographical area. Share this with someone who needs a little extra help or motivation in the fight for a pain-free everyday life.

 

Here's how to ask your questions

 

  1. I Comments Box on this page. Scroll down the web page until you see the comment field - then enter your name (anonymously if you wish - if you use real names this will be abbreviated to first name + first letter of your last name for personal information reasons) and submit your question. The more comprehensive you write - assuming it is relevant - the easier it is for our clinicians to answer your question in a good way.
  2. Via private message on Our Facebook page (Vondt.net - Musculoskeletal health information)

 

Chiropractor Alexander Andorff

chiropractor alexander andorff

Alexander has a master's degree in chiropractic and has worked as a chiropractor since 2011 - he works at Kiropraktorhuset Elverum. He has a broad competence in relation to problems within musculoskeletal disorders - and has a high evidence-based focus on the patient also receiving the advice / exercises / training guidance / the ergonomic adaptation that allows them to achieve a long-term improvement of their problems, and in this way prevent the pain from recurring. He lives by the motto that 'exercise is the best medicine' and tries to encourage more movement in everyday life through everyday activities such as trips and cross-country skiing, but also knows that it can be an extensive process to get out of the pain pit once you have ended up there. . Therefore, advice, exercises and measures are also adapted to the individual.

 

"I recognize that a musculoskeletal problem is always a combination of several factors - e.g. joint restrictions (stiff joints), myalgias (overactive, weak, dysfunctional muscles), muscle imbalance (too tight muscles in some places and too inactive elsewhere), dysergonomic working positions (a bad office chair combined with too much sitting can result in a sore back) and incorrect movement patterns (Wrong gait can aggravate your ailments). Precisely for this reason, it is important that the focus is on the main purpose of getting you better on all levels. I have chosen to answer questions here on Vondt.net to emphasize my vision for this - as well as help to break down the myth that a chiropractor just 'breaks' - feel free to ask questions under an anonymous username or via first name. Looking forward to doing my best to help you on the path to a better life. " - Alexander

 

The greatest wealth is good health

 

- Do something about the pain! Get them examined by clinics.

Don't let pain become part of your everyday life. Regardless of your situation, whether it is with heavy physical work from a young age or a lot of sedentary office work, it is so that your back and body can always achieve better function than it is in PR today. Our first recommendation for pain is to seek out one of the three occupational groups that are publicly authorized through the health authorities:

 

  1. chiropractor
  2. manual therapist
  3. Physical therapist

 

Why has Vondt.net chosen to focus on the three occupational groups of physical therapy, manual therapy and chiropractic?

Their public health authorization is a result of the authority's recognition of their comprehensive education and is a security for you as a patient and entails among other special benefits - such as protection through Norwegian Patient Injury Compensation (NPE). It is a natural security to know that these occupational groups are registered in this scheme for patients - and, as mentioned, we recommend investigating / treating occupational groups with this associated scheme. We do this as a security for the people we are in contact with through our counseling service, but that does not mean looking down on other occupational groups that fall outside this category. There are many skilled clinicians out there. A good clinician will also focus on eliminating what it is not before putting together an assessment and eventual treatment plan.

 

The first two occupational groups (chiropractor and manual therapist) also have referral rights (to imaging diagnostics such as X-ray, MRI and CT - or referral to a rheumatologist or neurologist when needed for such an examination) and sick leave (may report sick leave if deemed necessary). Keywords for improved musculoskeletal health involve more proper stress in everyday life (ergonomic fit), generally more movement and less static sitting, as well as increased focus on regular exercise.

 

Below is the comment box that we want you to use for any questions

 

Some of the most frequently visited topics are the most frequently asked questions:

- Arthritis (arthritis)

- Osteoarthritis (osteoarthritis)

Fibromyalgia

- Foot pain

- Crystal Disease / BPPV

- rheumatism

- Shockwave Therapy

84 replies
  1. Vondt.net says:

    Hey,

    Use this comment field if you want to comment on this article or have questions

    Have a nice day still!

    SVAR
  2. Marita says:

    Hello. Struggling with finger joints to wonder what it might be. Is thumb, index finger, middle finger and half ring finger on both sides. Joints are terribly painful and often lock up. Started with the area before the palm (where the clock is). Now flows up to the elbow at worst. Lazy a lot if I sit still or lie down. The doctor says it's my fibro, but the pain until it moves, I have had this constantly for 3 months now… Very difficult when I lose things to the fingers do most of what they want… Should I just find out that it is the fibro this too, or could it be something else?

    SVAR
    • Chiropractor Alexander Andorff (MNKF) says:

      Hi Marita,

      Pain in the thumb, index finger, middle finger and half ring finger is a characteristic symptom of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (ie pinching of the median nerve inside the wrist).

      It can sometimes also present as pain up the elbow - and that you experience reduced grip strength due to lack of 'power supply' from the nerve. Over time, this can also lead to muscle wasting in the teen eminence (which can almost look like deep 'dips' in the palm of the hand at the thumb).

      I would recommend that you be examined for carpal tunnel syndrome.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander Andorff
      Authorized chiropractor, MNKF - Chiropractor House Elverum

      SVAR
  3. N Hovda says:

    Muscle knot under the foot. Struggling with muscle knot in the arch of the foot. Is a little cool that is hard, tender and hurts when I walk and sit. It gets worse the more I strain my foot. Try to massage as well as roll the foot over a small foam roller for only short-term recovery. (The doctor says that there is nothing medical to do, but can try a chiropractor). Is there any treatment?

    SVAR
    • Chiropractor Alexander Andorff (MNKF) says:

      Hey,

      Thanks for the question. The answer is that this sounds like one will need a little more information before one can say directly what should be done here.

      1) Is the pain also present in the heel or at the front of the heel - or would you say that the pain is only in a local point in the arch of the foot?
      2) When did the pain occur and how long have it lasted? Are they only on one foot or do you have pain in the other as well?
      3) Does it hurt to step on your foot in the morning or after sitting still?
      4) Regarding treatment, there are a number of measures, but these will be based on a clinical and possible imaging assessment. For example, pressure wave therapy has a good documented effect against plantar fasciitis - which is a common cause of the symptoms you mention above. This will often be combined with home exercises, joint mobilization and pressure point treatment.
      5) Have photos or other examinations of the foot been taken?

      Differential diagnoses at this stage include plantar fasciitis, myalgia in the sole of the foot (and / or calf) / joint restrictions in the smaller ankles.

      Great if you can number your answers according to the questions above.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
  4. Stian H says:

    Hi .. have gone to chiro- and physio- due. extensive stiffness in the thoracic and lumbar part, has almost got rid of the ailments after about 14 treatments, it has ended now, but in retrospect started to get currents / tickling / stings in the arm and down the thumb. Occasionally experiences pain / pressure in the arm as well. Should I seek treatment again or is it something that will diminish over time?

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF) says:

      Hi Stian,

      Thanks for your question.

      With so little information, it becomes difficult for me to say whether this will decrease or not.

      What can be said is that currents / radiation / tingling that goes down the arm and out to the thumb is due to a pressure on or irritation of the median nerve - this nerve goes from the brachial plexus and down into the arm where it innervates the intrinsic muscles of the hand.

      The three most common causes of median nerve compression / irritation are:

      1) Carpal tunnel syndrome - Pain in the thumb, index finger, middle finger and half ring finger is a characteristic symptom of carpal tunnel syndrome. It can sometimes also present as pain up the elbow - and that you experience reduced grip strength due to lack of 'power supply' from the nerve.
      2) Pronator Teres Syndrome - A compression of the median nerve in the forearm.
      3) Irritation of the nerve in the neck / thoracic outlet - which may be the basis for TOS (thoracic outlet syndrome). This is due to the dysfunction of the muscles and joints in the cervical motor area. It is especially tense scalenii muscles that can give rise to this condition, often in combination with dysfunction of the first rib and upper part of the thoracic columna.

      Personally, I would recommend a clinical examination of your problem - so that you can get the correct exercises / training guidance and aim for a long-term improvement of the problem.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
      • Stian Henriksen says:

        Hi again, I am usually very tense and have a lot of knots in the shoulder region, I think my ailments with currents / radiation / tingling down the arm is probably largely due to this - so I guess I just have to get better with training / exercises like you wrote in a previous thread .. but over to a slightly different matter: I came across an ad from a company that sells "attitude correcting" clothes .. anodyne dot no .. is there any hold in this or is it true and best solution to go for treatment at the physio?

        please,
        Stian

        SVAR
        • Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF) says:

          Hi Stian,

          Yes, the best solution with the most team in terms of evidence is training / exercises in combination with relaxation, facilitation at work to avoid one-sided loads, as well as physical treatment when needed. There are many who try to make a fortune on so-called theories that appeal to "quick fix" solutions - but unfortunately without much support in research or studies that have been done in the field.

          Regarding posture, you can still get pain by sitting straight on a chair - it is then the one-sided load that will cause pain. "The next one is the best" is a good expression when it comes to load (eg sitting position), as this will lead to varied load on muscles and joints - which means that no individual areas become overloaded and pain sensitive.

          Regards.
          Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF)

          SVAR
  5. Ole says:

    Hi, I have been diagnosed with Bertollotti syndrome and operated twice for this. Have been told that this is a congenital error and rare disease. I'm not getting better, but worse. Think I have to 2% disabled myself after 100 years of consecutive working life. Has constant pain around the clock. Have tried most things. The only thing that helps me is to walk and keep warm.

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF) says:

      Hi Ole,

      So sad to hear that you are affected by this disorder.

      Bertolloti's syndrome is a rare, congenital condition - which usually does not become symptomatic until the end of the 20s or the beginning of the 30s. To put it a little simply, with this condition the lower vertebrae (L5) will gradually 'merge' with the upper part of the sacrum (S1). This merging between these two joints leads to a change in the biomechanics and how you load the back, as the L5 intervertebral disc and the joint will no longer function sufficiently as a shock absorber and support beam under load.

      This leads to a change in your movement and that the next intervertebral disc gets the load - namely L4 (fourth lower back vertebra). Over time, it has been seen that this disc will (much faster than normal) be broken down until a disc disease or disc prolapse occurs in this disc, which in turn puts pressure on the L5 nerve root. This pressure against the nerve root provides the basis for sciatica symptoms / ailments and radiation down one or both legs.

      Surgical procedures, injections and blockade treatment are the preferred treatment methods for this problem. Otherwise recommend training and physical treatment with a physical therapist with a public operating supplement, as this is a chronic disorder that you will unfortunately unfortunately have to live with for the rest of your life.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
  6. Kristin Aa says:

    Hey!

    Occasionally get a burning / stinging sensation on the upper side of the foot up against the calf and a little on the outside of the ankle when I walk. It hurts so much that I have to stop and lift my leg.

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF) says:

      Hi Kristin,

      Your symptoms are quite characteristic shin splints.

      Overloading or malfunctioning can cause an inflamed reaction in the tissue, which reproduces pain when applying pressure to the foot / ankle. Meningitis most often affects athletes, but the condition also affects those who suddenly become very good at training and do not give themselves enough rest or recovery in between workouts. Mistakes in the foot, such as overpronation or collapse of the arch of the foot, may predispose you to osteoporosis. Such an overload can occur when repetitive impact load exceeds the natural healing and repair speed of the tissue.

      Inflammatory treatment of osteomyelitis is treated with rest, ice, massage, muscle stretching and exercise exercises. But one should also evaluate walking and running patterns to find which muscles and joints are not performing optimally and causing the overload. If you have recurrent osteomyelitis, it is a good idea to see a clinician for an examination - so that this person can find the reason why you get this problem again and again.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
  7. Mona K. says:

    Hello.

    The last week I have had severe pain that started in my lower back. It now sits mostly in the seat, especially at the tailbone. The pain occasionally goes out in the thighs and hip area. It is most painful to sit, as well as bend over to put on shoes or something else, for example. The pain occurred without any clear triggering cause, no sudden twisting or heavy lifting. Had the same pain in October 2016, but then it passed without treatment. Only rest and voltarol. This time it has not helped anything special with voltarol and paracetamol. For information, I have been diagnosed with scoliosis early on, but to a "mild" degree. Have had pelvic discharge during the last pregnancy 9 years ago. 2 years ago I had a fall right on a rock edge that hit my tailbone. It was terribly painful for 2-3 days, but went away. Otherwise I am somewhat overweight, but in good physical shape and exercise 2-3 days a week. Mostly dance like zumba, but also strength. Works in kindergarten, and has some lift in my job. What do you think is the reason for this pain?
    MK

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF) says:

      Hi Mona,

      Low back pain can be caused by a number of causes and is often composed of several factors and structures. Let's summarize some of what we know:

      1) The pain is localized to the lower part of the lower back, the seat (as well as the tailbone) and occasionally to the thighs and hip area.
      2) The pain is provoked by sitting (compression) and flexed positions.
      3) Painkillers have had little effect.

      My first differential diagnosis is against dysfunction in joints and muscles at the lumbosacral transition (where the lower back meets the sacrum), combined with overactive and tight myalgias in the buttocks and hips. Especially piriformis (known to cause pain towards the coccyx) and gluteus medius / minimus are three muscles that are probably involved in your problem. Furthermore, there is probably also involvement of impaired function in the pelvic joint on the same side - something that often occurs together with piriformis syndrome / problems. Based on the fact that it worsens with compression and flexion (forward bending), we can also not rule out that there is a nerve or disc irritation in the clinical picture.

      Given that you have not had the effect of painkillers and rest, I would recommend that you consult a publicly authorized clinician (chiropractor or manual therapist) near you for an assessment of your pain picture. They will also be able to give you exercises and training instructions tailored to you.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
      • Mona K. says:

        Thank you for your answer. Then it will be to book an appointment with a chiropractor on Monday. Sincerely, Mona

        SVAR
        • Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF) says:

          Good luck and good recovery, Mona.

          Feel free to contact me again if you have questions another time.

          Sincerely,
          Alexander Andorff - Chiropractor (MNKF)

          SVAR
  8. Marie says:

    Hey,
    Have had crystal disease and now the neck, neck, jaw and upper back have become completely tense afterwards and are struggling with dizziness, headaches and muscle aches.

    What can I do about this? Think I do not have crystals still because it is different now, and am told by physio that I do not have crystals, but am not normal and healthy like I was before.

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hey,

      If the clinician is trained in it, you can easily identify if you have crystal disease / benign positional dizziness. If these tests are negative, it indicates that the dizziness is most likely due to dysfunction in the muscles and joints - one of the most common causes of dizziness. Neck-related (cervicogenic) dizziness is also often combined with headaches.

      Manual treatment of joints and muscles has been shown to have an effect on reducing symptoms due to cervicogenic dizziness (Reid et al, 2005).

      Recommends that you address the dysfunction in the neck with exercises / training and expert treatment of joints and muscles.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander (Chiropractor - MNKF)

      SVAR
  9. Anita Lie says:

    Hey!

    Wondering if you can please help me interpret an MRI answer?

    For information, I have previously been diagnosed with osteoarthritis in the left big toe, and have had surgery with bracing.

    MRI pelvis with hips:
    Without iv. contrast. X-ray pelvis with hips from March 14, 2017 for comparison.
    Normal signals from the bone marrow. No signs of fracture or destruction. Degenerative changes at the IS joints and the symphysis. There are incipient degenerative changes in the hip joints. No hydrops, corpus liberum or synovitis on either side. No established coxarthrosis. No evidence of labrum injury. Off the trochanter major region on both sides, a discreetly elevated signal is seen on fluid-weighted sequences compatible with mild soft tissue edema. Interpreted as mild bilateral trochanteritis, somewhat more pronounced on the right side. Mild tendinosis is noted in the m. Gluteus minimus and medius tendon bilaterally. No bursitis. Normal hamstring attachments on the buttock knots. Nothing to notice at the lower anterior abdominal wall. Unobtrusive findings in the groin. Normal signals from muscles. No evidence for ischiofemoral impingement problems. No free fluid in small pelvis.
    R: Mild trochanter tendinitis bilaterally, slightly more pronounced on the right side. Confer text.

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hi Anita,

      I have answered your question in the comments section below 'MRI examination'(click here to read it).

      Regards.
      Alexander (Chiropractor - MNKF)

      SVAR
  10. Mariann Fjelde says:

    Hey
    I struggle a lot with severe neck and shoulder pain and have relative pain throughout my back every day. I struggle a lot with the right side of the pelvis. This becomes very painful when moving. Often waking up at night where hands and feet lose the feeling and I have to shake them to get the feelings back there. Struggling a lot with pain in the wrists and fingers in the cold, then I lose blood supply out there. Also have a problem where I hold on to things and just lose this out of my hands. Also has a knee on the right side that locks and makes clicking sounds that also hurts with a lot of movement. My ankle on the right side also only fails occasionally and the foot can twist properly and I have fallen to the ground from this 2 times in a standing position. Mvh Mariann

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hi Mariann,

      There was a lot going on here. Based on what you write, there can be a number of possible reasons. Highly recommend that you contact knowledgeable treatment to investigate your problem. It really seems like you need help (both treatment and training) with this here.

      Good luck.

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
  11. Janne lohne says:

    Hello. I was hit from behind in a car in 1996. I was then pregnant without knowing it. Was then stiff from the hips and up to the neck. They said it was just pelvic solution - then locking - so muscular. In 2012, they found out after much back and forth that I had had a fracture in the L5-S1 for many years. In 2012, it was braced in the same area with plates and screws. 2 years later there was just as much pain and they therefore took them out again - the plates and screws.

    Now I go to water training with physio x 1 per week, manual physiotherapy xi week and self-training with a program from physio 1-2 times per week + Pain clinic 1 time per month and get pain blocks.

    Everything I do only works in the top 2 days. Works in 80% position. The problem is that I have pain all the time .. when my back gets tired I can not lift my right leg at all. Nobody understands any of this.

    I am very stiff and have pain in the lower back and radiating to the right side both in front, behind and forward in the groin and the hip flexor on the right side. Can you help me?
    Regards Janne

    SVAR
  12. Marita says:

    Hi, have been to the chiropractor three times for a sore neck and have since had severe pain in the ribs, just below the breasts. This is very tiring and painful. Will be yours again after Easter. Should I continue or end there? I've never had pain there before. It moves from right to left. What am I doing?

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hi Marita,

      It sounded strange. Strange also how your rib pain moves from side to side - this gives reason to believe that it can be muscular.

      Does it hurt when inhaling deeply or turning your upper body to the side?

      Recommend that you call your chiropractor tomorrow and talk to him / her about this discomfort of yours. It may be appropriate for you to spend more time focusing on the intercostal muscles and the muscles within the shoulder blades at the next consultation.

      Get well!

      Regards.
      Alexander (Chiropractor, MNKF)

      SVAR
  13. Bente Heia says:

    Hello. I have long gone with pain in my right hip. Stinging pain feels like a belt around the abdomen. Also gets pain when walking on that side. If I stand for too long straight up and down, I can hardly walk or bend. What can this be?

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hi Bente,

      I would like to help you find out.

      1) You write that it has been like this for a long time - how long is it about?
      2) The pain is stinging and can also go towards the stomach - do you mean that they radiate from the hip and towards the stomach, as well as the groin?
      3) The pain is also worst when walking and too much static load?
      4) Has a diagnostic imaging examination of your hip and / or back been taken?
      5) Do you experience numbness, radiation or tingling down your leg or legs?

      Feel free to number your answers.

      Regards.
      Alexander Andorff, Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
  14. Sissel Strand says:

    Hey
    For several years I have been bothered by some severe pain in one knee. This happens at night when I have to stretch my foot. Have not overloaded the knee in advance. As a kid, I used to fall a lot on my knees. And got so-called "water" in the knee. Think it's more painful winter time. Is there anything I can do that will soothe the pain?

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hi Sissel,

      It sounds tiring.

      1) How many years has it been like this?
      2) Do you also suffer from leg cramps in the same leg?
      3) Have you ever injured your knee or similar?
      4) Do these night pains occur every single night - or can it be a stay?

      Feel free to number your answers.

      Regards.
      Alexander Andorff, Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
  15. Kyphosis in the neck says:

    Hello.

    I have kyphosis in my neck, prolapse and am very stiff in the neck. Lots of tension headaches, migraines and eye headaches. Some days very weak in the arms due to prolapse. Pain down the arms. Osteoarthritis of the neck and fingers. Have tried several series of physiotherapy that did not help more than one that I froze at night. Does Chiropractic Help?

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hey,

      It sounds like you have extensive ailments and problems in the musculoskeletal system. Kyphosis in the neck is very unusual.

      You will probably need long-term treatment - preferably physiotherapy - in combination with progressive training. Exercise and exercises will be the only way to address the cause of your problem. Of course, joint treatment - which has good evidence behind it - can also play an important role in your fight back to a pain-free life.

      The most important thing you do now is to seek help from a clinician - someone who can help you train at your own pace.

      Regards.
      Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF)

      SVAR
  16. Bente Heia says:

    1.) Have probably had it 1 year or more.
    2.) It stings and aches around the abdomen and back.
    3.) Is worst when I sit and have to get up, can not and keep my back straight. It sticks very much in the hip then.
    4.) Has taken one picture of the lower back 10 years ago approx. I was told that I had light wear and tear, but that it was normal.
    5.) Can feel it radiating down to the knee occasionally.

    SVAR
  17. Toril says:

    Hey!

    Have for many years struggled with pain that I suspect may be due to deformities in the pelvis.

    It has been said by a doctor before that I have a difference in leg length and scoliosis but it was unclear if one caused the other.

    Short summary:

    Began with low back pain in adolescence. Later clear stiffness in the lower back and decreasing pain. Has in the last 10-15 years experienced increasing pain in the hips, upper back, shoulder and neck. The hip pain on the right side is very pronounced and I wake up almost every night from pain that radiates from the hip and down the outside of the leg all the way down to the middle of the leg.

    I am also very bothered by pain in the tailbone and if I sit a lot it hurts a lot when I get up again. I have occasionally been plagued with neck headaches. The shoulders are often inflamed (the mucous membranes). When I stand straight up and down I am clearly crooked and one shoulder is 2-3 cm higher than the other. I have a slightly lame gait and have chronic pain.

    Because my ailments are so extensive I do not know where to start and the doctor mostly prescribes painkillers. Has used various anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications more or less constantly for 20-30 years.

    I'm 47 years old.

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (Chiropractor - MNKF) says:

      Hi Toril,

      It sounds like you are describing a scoliosis condition - which can often cause the ailments you describe.

      Typical signs of scoliosis:

      - Uneven muscles on one side of the spine
      - A 'rib hump', where you see that the ribs on one side are higher than the other
      - Uneven pelvic height, arm length and leg length
      - Occasionally slow nerve response (in some cases)

      How does a clinician find out if you have scoliosis?
      If the spine has an increased deviation of more than 10 degrees, then this is classified as a scoliosis. A therapist will observe and perform several examinations (including Adam's test) to evaluate a patient's spine.

      If it is suspected that the patient has scoliosis, then the patient will be sent for an X-ray examination (chiropractor, therapist and doctor are the three occupational groups with the right to refer to this type of examination). The total column (the entire back) in a standing position will normally be taken both from the side and in front. To measure the degrees of scoliosis, the radiologist will evaluate Cobb's angle and see how many degrees the deviation is at. Cobb's angle is measured by comparing the angle of the upper vertebra involved in the scoliosis condition with the lower vertebra involved.

      So I want to start with the following:

      1) Have the extent of your scoliosis mapped
      2) Assess sole adjustment if necessary. backrests to correct leg length difference
      3) Evaluate physical treatment of affected muscles and joints - painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs have their role when there is acute pain, but should not be something you go on constantly for a long time

      Where in the country do you live? I can of course help you with the examination and any referral to the diagnostic imaging examination if you are close to my whereabouts.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander Andorff, Chiropractor (MNKF)

      SVAR
      • Toril says:

        Hi and thank you very much for the informative answer. I live in Troms and am happy to receive tips about a chiropractor or manual therapist in my area.

        SVAR
  18. Mona M. N says:

    Hey,
    I have had problems with my knees for periods of the last 3 years now, but it goes very up and down, both time periods and pain level.

    Has been diagnosed with both running knee (by a doctor) and jumping knee (by a chiropractor). My pain has been quite diffuse and around the entire kneecap, as well as "behind" or "inside" if you understand .. But mostly under the kneecap. Both after exercise and especially when I am actually lying down, and my leg is completely stretched out.

    The pain started in 2013/14 after I started running a lot (sometimes 10 km x4 a week), and I have never trained strength.

    In September last year, I broke my foot and was virtually inactive until February this year.
    But then it got extra bad again this year as soon as I started to get active again. Now the pain is so bad and my knees have been aching since March. They work both at night, when I walk, when I sit, almost all the time, but especially after activity (but it goes very up and down then). Has been on sick leave since February.

    I went to the doctor, physiotherapist and chiropractor for the first time this year.
    I got to try a little of each of the treatments in April and May, everything from strength exercises of the thighs, to electro-acupuncture, to pressure wave treatment. It seemed to work, but then I went to the south as a tour guide, and now the pain is back full and worse than it has ever been, and it only gets worse and worse. The pain came back about 2 weeks ago after I jumped and danced for about 10 minutes as a mascot.

    It hurts both above, below and inside / behind the kneecap, both when I walk and when I lie / sit still..I take strong painkillers and freeze my knees 2-3x daily but it only gets worse ..

    My question is, is there hope? Is there anything else I can try that I have not tried yet?

    Is 100% on sick leave for a week right now, but it has not gotten much better since the incident with the dancing / jumping, so I wonder if I should go home or if it is safe to continue at work? .. When I'm at work I walk about 7-10,000 steps daily. Can I do worse injuries to my knees if I continue to walk / strain them?

    Accepts all tips and advice and is willing to try most things for now I am so frustrated and a little worried ..

    SVAR
    • Alexander v / fondt.net says:

      Hi Mona,

      See that you are not referring to imaging even though this is now starting to become a long-term problem. Has an MRI or diagnostic ultrasound been taken of your knees - and if so, do they show any damage or the like?

      There is always hope for healing, but if the calculation "load / strength capacity / healing" does not increase, then the damage will either - if the healing goes to zero - persist or get worse if the calculation goes to minus.

      No two injuries are exactly alike and for this type of problem - especially when it starts to have persisted for a long time - it will probably require a lot of rehabilitation training (feet, calves, thighs and hips, as well as the core must be strengthened to reduce the incorrect load on the knees ) and also some symptom-relieving treatment (pressure wave treatment is the gold standard for tendon problems).

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
      • bow says:

        Hi Alexander. Thanks for reply. I have now taken MRI images of my knees as it has only gotten worse. Got the following answer:

        «MRI right knee:
        There are intact menisci, cruciate ligaments, lateral ligaments, and the patellar tendon.

        Normal bone marrow and articular cartilage in the femorotibial joint.

        Slightly irregular articular cartilage on medial articular facet of patella. No other evidence for current pathology.

        R: Slightly irregular articular cartilage on medial articular facet of patella, otherwise normal findings.

        MRI left knee:
        There are intact menses, cruciate ligaments, lateral ligaments and the patellar tendon.

        Irregular articular cartilage in the femorotibial joint. No hydrops or Baker's cyst of significance.

        R: Irregular articular cartilage on medial articular facet of patella, otherwise normal findings ».

        What does this mean? Is it the jumper knee I have?

        Have pain all the time almost, even when I lie still. Can walk quite long distances before it hurts, but if I bend my knees just a little or take as much as a small jump, I have pain for many days, sometimes weeks afterwards.
        The knees seem so weak.

        What does the description of the MRI images mean and is there anything I can do?

        SVAR
  19. More H. says:

    Has after a long period of stiffness and pain in the lower back been shown a modic change in the lower back (grade 1-2). What does that mean and what do I do next now? Experiencing low back pain with radiating both legs.

    SVAR
  20. Turf says:

    I'm a 65 year old outdoorsman. For several years I have been squatting too much with the main emphasis on my right knee. A year ago, I stretched the tendon over the bone to the left of the patella in the longitudinal direction of the leg, right knee.

    For two or three years I have always been too hot at night (not sweaty, not hot to the touch, but feeling too hot on the underside of the body). I think the heat imbalance at night comes from lyme disease, cf. blood test with a high result for lyme disease.

    2 1/2 months ago I was lying with bare legs under only a sheet and with the window open on a high mountain hotel. Towards nightfall I woke up to the fact that my legs had cooled down.

    I knew:

    1) intense stabbing pain in the above mentioned tendon, and I felt
    2) murmur in the kneecap. I could not sleep. In the first ten days, this was repeated from time to time from time to time. For the next ten days, this was absolutely repeated every night.

    For the next month, I felt almost just murmur in my kneecap, absolutely every night. In the last month I have felt murmur in the kneecap and
    3) stabbing pain in the bone to the left of the patella, one and another night sometimes. In the total period of 2 3/4 months, I have felt some murmur and stiffness in the morning that has subsided after a short time. Symptoms do not match any clear diagnosis. I have never felt pain in step with movements, I have never had my foot twisted, I have never had pain to go down stairs, I have rarely had pain during the day, I have never had pain to turn in bed, I have never had redness, I have never had swelling, I have rarely had symmetrical pain, I have never had a high sink, I have never had a fever. I just woke up in pain in the middle of the night, and only in my right knee. Weather changes may have something to say, but they are not always true.

    Rhubarb juice led to murmur in the entire right leg. X-ray shows only normal cartilage wear and undamaged bones. Transillumination may show a small lack of meniscus and a baker's cyst on the back, but that only explains a little fluid bags that the doctor found (but I could not see the fluid bags). The doctor does not understand what I'm doing wrong. The superior believes that there is no direct connection between the Lyme disease and the knee pain.

    I'm going to ME and rheumatology in a month and a half. What am I doing wrong? Do I have to stay calm, do I have to dress my knee warm, or can I go on holiday while waiting and go hiking in shorts?

    Regards

    Turf

    SVAR
  21. Vigdis says:

    Hello.

    I have asked on vondt.net before, but you did not know about what I am seeking help for.

    I need information about treatment / measures for chondrocalcinosis and chondromatosis, but there is certainly little knowledge about this among therapists (and I have been to the many…) It was proven in me by a pathologist after knee surgery for approx. 10 years ago, but the knowledge about this is so limited among therapists, so there is unfortunately little help to get.

    I have had four synovectomy surgeries on my knees to remove inflamed tissue and then get better for a while after that, but then the pain comes back. My orthopedist says that this is an autoimmune disease that breaks down the joints. Now has osteoarthritis grade 3 with very soaked cartilage and exposed bones in the knees. After the last knee operation I got Colchicine by a rheumatologist who has had an effect for approx. 3 months, but now it looks like they have no effect anymore. The next step now is prosthesis, but naturally itches me for it. I take Nobligan retard + Paracet daily and have tried most of the training (strength training, pool training, etc.), but it mostly leads to increased pain and swelling for days afterwards. But I still try to train moderately. I have gone to a physiotherapist with a fitness center and manual therapist. Has been admitted Rheumatism Hospital, but even there they had no experience with this.

    So I was just as wise when I was discharged. It seems that because the diagnosis is so rare, they just shrug their shoulders and say "I do not know". They are reluctant to deal with it. The orthopedist is only the "carpenter" here, and has done what he can.

    I think it is very strange that it is not possible to get any help or guidance on this disease. It is admittedly very rare, but via the facebook group of vondt.net I have come in contact with another person who has the same diagnosis, who has a lot of pain and is struggling to get help. So it can not be completely unknown? As it is now, I have almost given up and try to accept that strong painkillers are the only alternative. But there is no optimal solution ..

    Do you have, or do you know anyone who has expertise in this? Thankful for answers.

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hi Vigdis,

      Unfortunately, I have no better and more comprehensive answer for you. For help from people who may be in the same situation, I can advise you to join the facebook group "Rheumatism and Chronic Pain: Research and News".

      Good luck and good recovery.

      Regards.
      Alexander, off. aut. chiropractor, M.sc. Chiro, B.sc. Health, MNKF

      SVAR
  22. AGL says:

    Hey!
    I am very bothered with my left hip, it hurts when I lie on my side or move my hip. Has been in pain since May this year. Have been to the doctor twice where I was once prescribed the Voltaren, to be told to stay calm, walk as little as possible and sit as little as possible, got a little better while I ate the Voltaren, but came back quickly when I stopped using them… The second time (at another doctor) I was told to be active in training muscles, as I have been doing for almost two months now. Starting to get tired of being in pain as I often wake up at night when I turn around or have been lying on my left side for too long. Any good tips? Should I contact a doctor again or book an appointment with a chiropractor, physiotherapist?

    SVAR
  23. Eva says:

    Hi! I do a circus-related sport where we often work with the arms over the head and also out to the side when we lift the body up in different positions. For over a year I have had pain in and around the shoulder ball itself at the end of the shoulder.

    This is only something that is triggered by touch or by certain movements and is not aching and constant. Typically triggering the pain is pulling the shoulder up towards the ear and / or vice versa «sinking down on the shoulder as in a push up. Backward rotation of the arm can also be painful. I also struggle with being terribly stiff in this area - also around the chest / front. The manual therapist thought I had poor mobility and worked with this, but when the mobility improved, the problem did not go away. It also hurts to move my arm down towards my body when I hold it out to the side.

    I do not have a lack of strength in the arm / shoulder and do not bother much about this during training even though I feel it. Days after training, however, I am very stiff. Do you have any idea what this might be? Gets very grateful for answers. I have talked to several therapists but it does not seem like I find someone who understands exactly how I use the shoulder during exercise and is able to find the specific problem.

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hi Eva,

      Your pain may indicate a combination of muscular imbalance and possible tendon injury - as well as potential joint dysfunction in the glenohumeral and AC joints. Because the pain is on the outside of the shoulder in the way you describe and is provoked by pressure, as well as certain movements - it may sound as if it is a squeezing syndrome of supraspinatus with associated painful myalgias in nearby stability muscles (pec majus, the other rotator cuff muscles and upper trapz among others).

      Diagnostic ultrasound can confirm if there is a rotator cuff injury in your case. Specific training of all root cuff muscles is recommended to restore muscular balance (you are probably very strong in certain muscles and rather weak in others - for comparison).

      Regards.
      Alexander, aut. chiropractor (M.sc. Chiro, B.sc. Health)

      SVAR
      • Eva says:

        Thank you for your answer! Will an MRI scan cover the same as ultrasound? I have been given an hour for this (in 100 years though). Will it be unjustifiable of me to train until this has been properly investigated?

        SVAR
        • Alexander says:

          You're welcome.

          Yes, an MRI examination will be able to reveal any muscle or tendon damage - possibly also if there is any impact on the labrum or joint capsule. Adapted training is recommended - and remember rotator cuff exercises (especially rotation exercises are important in rehab training).

          Good luck!

          SVAR
  24. G says:

    Hello. For 5 years I have had back problems. The first two years were just muscle squeezing and it was difficult to sit on hard ground due to sore tailbone. And was heavy to keep peeing inside. After 6 months, urination problems disappeared. After two years of physiotherapy treatment, new problems appear in the form of sharp pain on the left side and sore lower back.

    I have a picture and assessment from a specialist, but I differ in what they think. One said it was nothing and the other said the problem needed to be addressed. I can send you x-ray photos by email. Recent X-rays have described that I have no problem - only the facet joints and their degeneration. When I start moving, walking or driving, the pain comes and the vortices go out of place. My physiotherapist ended the collaboration with me because after two years of treatment we had no effect. Can you help me?

    SVAR
    • Alexander v / Vondt.net says:

      Hey G,

      No, I can probably not help you any further than the help you have already received from medical specialists and physiotherapists. But can recommend a secondary examination at another recommended primary contact near you - e.g. manual therapist or chiropractor.

      Good luck.

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
  25. Ingrid says:

    Hey!
    I have considered going to a chiropractor, but I'm wondering how he can help me.

    I practice karate as usual and was training, when the problem degenerated. Repeated clicking sounds, but no pain on the left elbow. But on the right elbow there are more "crunchy" sounds, and after repeated blows on training it gives pain. Sometimes it does not hurt so much, while other times the pain is so great that I do not use my right hand in training. This same "crunchy" sound also comes when I move my wrist and the wrist seems weak. It is not so beneficial to go to exercise and experience pain.

    Maybe 7-8 years ago I went to a physiotherapist because of the sound. He thought it was important to try to treat it before there was pain. The exercises I did to my wrist made me feel worse, and I had not started to get a sore elbow yet. In the elbow I got acupuncture, which I also did not feel worked and due to financial reasons I chose to stop the treatment.

    Now I am in the best competition years as a 22 year old, and would like this trifle not to stop me from training and competitions.
    Do you know what it can be in the various joints?

    How can this possibly be treated?

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hi Ingrid,

      Due to persistent problems over a long period of time - and the fact that the condition does not seem to improve, as well as causing severe pain at times - it should be investigated with diagnostic imaging.

      A chiropractor, like a doctor, has the right to refer to public imaging diagnostics (including MRI). Public imaging means that you only pay a minimal deductible instead of a significantly larger sum if you were to take this privately.

      It does not sound as if the physiotherapist has done anything wrong, but it is strange that the condition has not improved, and that the exercises you had worsened the condition - which at the time sounded like lateral epicondylitis or other tendinosis in the wrist extensors.

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
  26. Jørgen says:

    Hey,

    Have something I think is an inflammation of the shoulder that has persisted for five days, but think to ask iom that the voltaren does not seem to help.

    It started with an acute overuse injury in the neck (without me knowing if it is relevant). The pain is constant and does not get worse with any kind of movement. It feels in a way like growing pain / headache low, in the middle of the shoulder (deltoid) - an annoying pain that never goes away. Does this sound like inflammation? Should I give the voltaren a few days to work (is early in use). Furthermore, it appears that the paracetamol is taking some of it temporarily.

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hi Jørgen,

      Several of the rotator cuff muscles, as well as other muscles in the shoulder / shoulder blade, are particularly involved in stabilizing and contributing to good function in the neck. In the case of acute overuse injury in the neck, it is very common for certain muscles to become pain-sensitive and in "defense mode" to protect the neck.

      There may also have been an injury to one of the mentioned rotator cuff muscles (for example supraspinatus) when you injured yourself. Does it hurt at night? Does it hurt to sleep on that shoulder? It may sound like a tendon injury or a tendonitis - but then it would also, most often, be reduced shoulder mobility (for example, when you lift your arms out to the side in abduction or forward in flexion).

      Would recommend that you have the pain investigated - in case it is a tendon injury. In the event of such injuries, it is important to start with the right measures as soon as possible for the best possible effect.

      Good recovery and good luck.

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
  27. Silje says:

    Are the exercises you have posted regarding carpal tunnel syndrome, are they useful after surgery or do you recommend someone else? I work in a kindergarten and am still on sick leave
    Regards Silje

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hi Silje,

      It becomes difficult to give concrete recommendations without seeing yourself in a clinical situation. Normally, you are given exercises by a physiotherapist after such an operation - with time aspect etc.

      Have you not received such a scheme?

      SVAR
  28. Arne N says:

    Have pain under the foot and out to the 4 toes when I move. A little better after a while. Thought at first it was podegra, but the big toe is good and not red. Have been on anti-inflammatory medication for a week and felt it was progressing, but when it ended the pain came back the way it started. What can I do about it in terms of load? Loves to dance and hopes the foot will be healthy.

    SVAR
  29. Unni S says:

    Hello. Am a lady of 59 who has an "impossible" question, but I'm starting to get a little desperate! My problem is that when I am on the toilet it sometimes happens that I get severe pain in the rectum / tailbone / between the legs. The pain is spasmodic and can last for up to a couple of hours, when I get it I just have to lie down and wait until it subsides, take what I can of painkillers.

    Have even experienced letting the water involuntarily. Have examined most things and the doctors just shake their heads and say they do not know. This can come from a couple of times a month to a couple of times a week. Has scoliosis, worn discs in the lower back, calcifications etc. that us old ladies get. Have also recently had to get up early in the morning, then have so much pain over the hip crest and in the pelvis, get shooting pain out in the big toe, that I can not either lie down, sit or stand. So I walk around the house like a lion in a cage. What I'm wondering is: Can the pain in the rectum / pelvis have anything to do with joints or discs in the lower back, pelvis or tailbone?

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hey Unni!

      My first question when I hear such a comprehensive presentation: Has an MRI examination of the lumbosacral spine and pelvis been taken? If so, what did the results show?

      PS - Your comment remained in our spam filter. Hence late response.

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
      • SVAR says:

        Responds late, but has had an MRI, has fluid accumulation in both hips, tendonitis in both hips plus a slight change in the ileosacral joint on the left side. Then a question again, should one take it easy or be active? Trying to be as active as I can, but it punishes itself at night.

        SVAR
  30. Ulrik S. says:

    Hi! Sore groin and lower back. Became very stiff. Can hardly pick up anything from the floor. Good therapists for this in Bergen?

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hi Ulrik,

      In Bergen I have several recommendations, but a modern chiropractor in Bergen I have a great sense of is Christian Høst. He will be able to give you good and professional treatment in relation to your problems.

      Good recovery and good luck.

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
  31. S says:

    Hey!

    I had surgery for both legs (chronic lodging syndrome) 12 weeks ago. Has had gradual follow-up with a physiotherapist, and has finally started calmly with football training again. The reason why I decided to perform surgery was that it was intense pain even with painkillers and no alternative treatment helped (including pressure wave, needles, massage, etc.). Due to upcoming national team gatherings and miscellaneous it was a bad time for me mtp operation, but saw no other way out when I never managed to play at 100%.

    The problem now, is that I have a constant discomfort, worst in the right leg. There is no training that entails this, but have not yet had a full intensive training yet, so do not know if it can make it worse. I just think it's very annoying to go around thinking about this all the time and think that this might turn into pain when I first get to be part of a hard football session. I have talked to a physiotherapist in a club about this, but not with national team physio. Regardless, as I have experience with, I will be sent to someone who knows more about this. Therefore, I thought that maybe I could get a recommendation from dikka about what is a good alternative to do now. It's nice to be able to get a little different advice from people who know what they're talking about. It is not certain that this will develop, but I went with a constant discomfort for 5-6-7 months before surgery, and I now feel that the discomfort I have today is a mild variant of it ..

    SVAR
    • Alexander says:

      Hey,

      Injury / scar tissue may have formed in the right leg that you are still bothered by.

      After a bilateral fasciotomy that you have undergone, the assigned physiotherapist who is responsible for your rehabilitation will go through four phases. These are clear clinical guidelines - and you can read more about the different phases with associated testing to be performed in terms of time and the like here (in Danish) (click here).

      After 12 weeks, you should be able to:
      - Report an improvement of 90-100% overall
      - Have 90% painless plantar flexion and dorsiflexion

      You should also be able to expect further improvement over the next four weeks with a gradual approach to treatment and training. So it is not completely abnormal that it lingers a bit after 12 weeks - but would you consider it to be more than 10% of the previous ailment? Or worse?

      Would also recommend regular physical therapy (2x a week) to maintain functionality in the treated area.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander

      SVAR
  32. UT says:

    Hello. Can you recommend a saddle chair as an office chair for people who struggle with back pain? Possibly with or without tilt function or with or without backrest? I sit a lot in front of the PC or stand in static positions in my job. This leads to pain especially in the lower back and I have previously had prolapse and a misalignment in the pelvis. I therefore think that I need to investigate what type of chair can be suitable for me so that I do not put unnecessary strain on my back when I have to sit at work for a long time. Do not know if this is important in relation to chair, but I am a powerful girl. Thank you for your answer.

    SVAR
  33. Ingrid says:

    7 weeks ago I destroyed my thumb by a ligament taking a piece of bone from my thumb and the ligament was stretched (smoked?). Has been wearing plaster for 6 weeks. Have removed the plaster and it has been 10 days. My hand constantly falls asleep and stings (feels like electricity in the hand). I have to get up several times a night, shake my hand, massage, etc. It is very uncomfortable. Have looked up on Google and think it must be carpal tunnel syndrome. Have tried to do various recommended exercises, but think it gets worse. Shaking, massaging and letting your arm swing while I walk is probably what works best. But I can not do it all the time. It looks like it's getting worse when I hold a book, write and the like. Is quite desperate and should probably see a doctor. Should I wait even longer to hope that it goes away by itself? (Has had surgery for Morton's syndrome and this may be reminiscent of this).
    Regards Ingrid

    SVAR
    • Alexander Andorff (MNKF) says:

      Hi Ingrid,

      That does not sound good. The recovery time will depend on how severe the avulsion fracture and your trauma were. How did the injury occur? Could you have suffered a crush injury in the same situation?

      It can definitely be reminiscent of nerve irritation in your hand, yes - which can also be directly related to the injury you received. After seven weeks, you can not expect that this has healed enough to be asymptomatic - however, I think you should have received a clearer instruction in what you should be able to expect in relation to the improvement time of your doctor.

      The pain can also be due to fluid accumulation around the fracture itself and your ligament damage - which thus takes up space inside the hand and leads to carpal tunnel syndrome due to the fluid taking up space next to the nerve.

      The symptoms you describe also fit with neurological irritation of the median nerve. The fact that you experience improvement when there is better blood circulation also supports the theory.

      If you are as desperate as you sound, I think you should see your doctor and have a conversation. But in relation to the extent of the damage you mention, it can be relatively normal to be in pain for a long time after you have finished the boring "plaster period".

      Light hand exercises that increase local blood circulation and strengthen the intrinsic hand muscles may cause temporary pain in the beginning, but as the function gradually improves, you should be able to expect them to relieve irritation in the future.

      Wish you a really good improvement further.

      Sincerely,
      Alexander (Authorized Chiropractor, M.sc. Chiro, B.sc. Health)

      SVAR
  34. Tone says:

    Hello. Have had a sore neck and headache for which I have received treatment. With a doctor and chiropractor, stress is the cause, so I have no underlying disease. The headache is better, but still struggling with stiff neck and murmurs on the right side of the neck, shoulder and down to the back. In addition, I have pressure sensitivity in half my face and neck and head, right side. For a couple of years I have had pressure sensitivity in the skin that has moved to different areas of the body. It lasts a couple of days, then it's gone for a while, then it comes back. This I now know on the right side has lasted for almost 2 weeks, and some days I can not wear a scarf around my neck as it hurts. Is it inflammation? I have a sedentary job with guidance PR phone in front of PC all day. Has been graded sick leave for 8 months. What can this be. Has taken countless / actions, does simple neck exercises, mindfullness, but it continues to murmur with moderate pain and pain in the skin.

    SVAR
  35. Marie says:

    Hi! I suddenly got a sore knee during a run a little over a week ago. The pain was mainly on the outside of the knee but eventually also almost the entire knee. I have run twice after that, and the pain has appeared after about 2-3 km. What can this be? How long should I wait to run again?

    SVAR
    • Alexander v / Did not find says:

      Hey Marie!

      Based on what you write, it may seem that the pain is to some extent due to iliotibial band syndrome. This typically causes pain that goes from the outside of the knee and into the knee during shock loads. Other possible causes are meniscus irritation due to the fact that you have increased your running frequency a little too fast. Try to replace the running with walks for at least 1 week and see how you feel after that.

      Also reminds that it is very important that you do enough hip exercises to relieve the knees and its structures. Strong hip muscles lead to a more correct load when running.

      SVAR
  36. Marianne says:

    Hi! I am an active and fitness-loving lady of 42 who has been diagnosed with labrum rupture in the hip, in addition to (or as a result of?) Squeezing. In the back there are several smoldering cover plate impressions, pronounced degenerative changes, as well as a synovial cyst. Troubled with pain when I walk and stand, as well as night pain. Referred to the assessment of hip arthroscopy, but it can take many weeks and months before I get to. I am afraid there will develop osteoarthritis in the joint, have already gone untreated for about 10 weeks. Has always been very active, trains 3-4 times a week, frequent mountain hikes and daily walks. Now the mood is loose that I can not walk and stand for a long time at a time without pain. What training methods can I use? Has access to top equipped strength room.

    SVAR
    • Alexander v / Did not find says:

      Hey Marianne! By squeezing the hip I assume you mean 'pincer impingement'? A labrum rupture in the hip can be, as you have experienced, very disabling and provide a basis for a number of pains both during the day and at night. With such hip injuries, it is extremely important to train specifically with the right hip exercises.

      I personally recommend exercising with elastic or a mini band to isolate the right muscle groups. You can see an example of such an exercise program in this the video (the link opens in a new window).

      It is also clear that your pain worsens with compression - ie when structures are squeezed together - so I would also recommend a treatment plan with a publicly authorized therapist with both traction treatment, adapted joint mobilization and laser therapy, as well as possible pressure wave treatment for tired tendons around your hip.

      PS - In addition, I would also recommend cycling on an exercise bike and swimming.

      Regards.
      Alexander

      SVAR
  37. solo says:

    Hi! I am a patient who has been operated on 5 times. Most recently about 14 days ago when I have bertolotti syndrome.
    My pelvis and lower back are really deformed.

    I have tried to find some info about that disease, but only find a Norwegian page and I have found it with you.
    I wish I found more info. Everything from how people live with the disease, if they get worse / better over the years, if they have gotten better / worse from operations, etc. Do you have more info for me?

    SVAR
    • Nicolay v / Does Not Find says:

      Hi! We will take this to the editors, so that we can create a comprehensive overview article with evidence-based information for those affected by Bertolotti syndrome. Thank you for letting me know. Wish you all the best!

      SVAR
  38. Christine says:

    Hey!
    I have a leg length difference of 4.4 cm. I had an X-ray of my back in March, and was told that I have scoliosis in my lower back at 32 degrees. And a very small scoliosis in the thoracic spine that only measures a few degrees.
    This scares me a lot because I have read that if you have a crooked back, ie scoliosis, it can put pressure on the lungs and heart and cause breathing problems and heart problems.
    I am very afraid that the scoliosis I have in my lower back and the scoliosis I have in my thoracic spine can give me problems with my lungs or heart.

    Hope I can get an answer on whether the 32 degree scoliosis I have in my lower back can affect the lungs or the heart?

    And if the small scoliosis I have in the thoracic spine can affect the lungs or the heart?

    Constantly worries me about this!

    SVAR
    • Nicolay v / Does Not Find says:

      Hey Christine! One of the first things you need to get an answer to is which way your scoliosis curves - if it leans away from the heart and lungs then there is absolutely no danger. You also mention that there is only a "small scoliosis in the thoracic spine", so there is no danger that it can be dangerous for the lungs and heart. Scoliosis must be extreme, 70 degrees and above, in order to press against the lungs and heart (1).

      Source: 1. Penn State Hershey Medical Center

      SVAR
  39. Katrina says:

    Hi! I was hit from behind in mid-October. Not great speed, but got a sore shoulder. Went to the chiropractor a few times and felt pretty good after a month. Then I did something stupid .. I rowed on a rowing machine for 15 min (1 month ago) with high intensity (have rowed a lot). I had not gotten off the rowing machine before so the whole neck and shoulder area stiffened. What happened? Was not soft tissue healed since I got such a big reaction. I feel better but still have painful trigger points that move. Is it some kind of inflammation I got? Should I see a chiropractor again? How long can such an inflammatory reaction last? When I overload a weak tissue, does the healing process of the soft tissue begin again?

    SVAR
    • Chiropractor Alexander Andorff says:

      Hi Katrina,

      As you may be familiar with, rear-end collisions are particularly linked to whiplash. This is a condition that can gradually worsen depending on which structures were stretched / damaged in the accident itself. Many examples may also indicate that this can occur even at lower speeds.

      Based on the time interval you mentioned on the rowing machine (15 minutes), I do not think you did anything directly "wrong", but rather that you were very unlucky. Based on what you write, it may seem that certain structures have reacted with a defensive reaction and that a larger accumulation of pain-sensitive soft tissue has formed around the affected areas.

      Considering that you have been in an accident, I would advise you to take an MRI of the neck and upper thoracic column (upper thoracic spine) - to rule out any neck prolapse. The chiropractor you mention has the right to refer you to such an image examination.

      Of the measures that you can start with right now, I would strongly recommend knitting exercises for strengthening the shoulder blade, shoulder and the transition to the neck. These also have a clinically proven effect against neck pain. You can watch video of these on our youtube channel here (in Danish).

      The exercises should be done four times a week. If you do not experience improvement, I would also recommend training the DNF muscles (deep neck flexors) - which are often affected by neck sling problems.

      Wish you a happy new year!

      With best regards,
      Alexander Andorff (authorized chiropractor, MNKF)

      SVAR
  40. Harald says:

    Hello. My boyfriend has chronic back pain, specifically L4 or S1, which I have applied for. We have been to a chiropractor, doctors .. but no one had an answer, no solution, the only closest solution we have found is at the fitness center, where he said that it is a disc that slips out if she often walks on hard surfaces, etc. And that I understand physical activity is the solution. We have tried new soles on shoes, and believe it or not, I massage her on the back every single day to loosen the pressure so that she can sleep at night or get through the day .. The worst thing was when she had to start up on handball again, it ended with a sleepless night and a sedative injection at the doctor. What do you think it could be? What should I possibly ask a chiropractor about? Will this require constant chiropractor every week? Is there a specific method I can do to solve this on my own?

    SVAR
    • Alexander v / Did not find says:

      Hi Harald,

      First, I would have had an MRI examination of the lumbosacral spine (lower back, sacrum and pelvis) - here you will be able to find out if it is a disc injury or disc prolapse. But with such prolonged and intense pain, I assume that such an examination has been performed? If so, what did it show?

      With best regards,
      Alexander

      SVAR
  41. Melita says:

    Hello. Wondering if s-shaped scoliosis right-convex torocally and left-convex lumbar can cause arthritis changes in IS joints?

    SVAR
  42. Helleland says:

    Sorry… I mean: is there a website you would recommend where exercises are shown that are safe 2 1/2 months after c5 / 6 prolapse in the neck which now does not give neurological results in the right arm anymore but which makes me feel crunching / a little beginning hurt with too much load? I can roll my neck nicely from side to side and around (but a little sore now when I roll backwards). Has been told by the physiotherapist that strength exercises are fy now, especially lifting upwards, also pushups (but do not know if it applies to all variants). Little information online about what is safe to do. Do not have a ribbed wall at home, would otherwise buy a training elastic. This IS a trifle, you know, but for me it is important not to end up in the hospital again - and do what is possible / allowed so as not to lose all the strength in your arms. Except weightlifting with barbell (light dumbbells allowed with allowed exercises). Where can I find information online about what is good and what is dangerous in my situation?

    SVAR
  43. Dagfinn says:

    Refers to nice video with exercises against sciatica (https://www.vondt.net/5-gode-ovelser-mot-isjias/).

    In the comments field you will find the following posts:

    «Find Ziem
    26/08/2016
    Good exercises described here, except lying back lift or "The Cobra". This exercise bends the back in a direction that is definitely not good for those who struggle with sciatica, and can thus make the disorder even worse than it was in the beginning. "

    Since it has been almost four years since this post was posted, is it time to give an answer?

    SVAR
    • Nicolay v / Vondt.net says:

      Hi Dagfinn,

      Yes, you're probably right. Bending backwards is called extension, and horizontal extension is used in the McKenzie protocol for sciatica and back pain. Read more about it in the study here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK539720/

      Sciatica can have several different causes, including prolapse or spinal stenosis. It is quite true that certain cases of these can be provoked by lying extension, but also that more people may experience relief. It simply depends on the cause and intensity of the sciatica pain.

      Wishing you a nice evening ahead!

      SVAR

Leave a reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to Contribute!

Write a comment

Your email address will not be published.